HONEY AND SYRUPS: HEALTHY AND NATURAL SWEETENERS WITH FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES

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Ángela-Mariela González-Montemayor1, Adriana C. Flores-Gallegos1, Lilia E. Serrato-Villegas2, Mercedes G. López-Pérez2, Julio César Montañez-Sáenz1, Raúl Rodríguez-Herrera1


1Food Research Department, School of Chemistry, Autonomous University
of Coahuila, Saltillo, Mexico, †Material Science Research Department, School
of Chemistry, Autonomous University of Coahuila, Boulevard Venustiano
Carranza and Jose Cardenas s/n, Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico.

2Biotechnology and Biochemistry Department, Center for Research and Advanced Studies-
IPN, Irapuato Unit, Guanajuato, Mexico

As part of a human diet, carbohydrates, also named as sugars, have been consumed since long time ago; glucose, fructose, and sucrose are the most important sweet tasting carbohydrates present naturally
in foods (Edwards et al., 2016). Glucose is ever-present in the diet and plays an important role in
the regulation of human metabolism, it can be consumed in two ways: as free sugar or bonded in polymers (starch, dextrins, and maltodextrins), in addition glucose could be bonded in disaccharides (e.g., fructose bond to glucose is sucrose) (White, 2014).
The sugars, besides being a source of energy affect the food texture and color, give its sweetness and also act as preservatives or flavor enhancers (Hinkova et al., 2015). Sugar is an important component of the modern diet, not only by the contribution of fruits and vegetables, but also by the sweeteners added to the processed foods and beverages. If the sweetener contribute to metabolize energy to the diet is a nutritive sweetener and if it not has contribution is a caloric one (White, 2014).

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